Sacha Chats with Christopher Wellons

The invaluable Sacha Chua has posted another in her series of Emacs chats. This time it's with Christopher Wellons. As regular readers know, I'm an admirer of Wellons and have written about him several times (1, 2, 3, 4, 5).

As usual, they talk about Wellon's work flow, his Emacs configuration, and his projects. As you can see from my previous posts on Wellons, he's the type of guy who is always working on little, interesting projects that often grow into something really useful. Watch the video to get an idea of what those projects are. Chua has a handy list of links to them on Github so that you can explore them after watching the video.

One of the things that I really liked was his with-package and with-package* macros. They make sure that your packages are loaded and that any package specific actions are taken at the proper time. I really like this because it provides a way of listing the packages you use in your init.el or .emacs file and then they get loaded automatically if they aren't already on your machine. Right now, I do this manually for each of my machines and that's just silly and error prone.

Wellons says that the macros are a little rough but I found them perfectly reasonable and the code is very nice as well. I'll be integrating them into my own configuration directly.

The chat is just under 57 minutes so plan accordingly. It's a great chat and one you won't want to miss.

This entry was posted in General and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.
  • Fuco

    with-package sounds like less-powerful version of use-package, which has been around for ages ;)

    • http://irreal.org jcs

      I assume you mean John Wiegley's package not the older one on EmacsWiki. I've looked at it and almost installed it several times but I always found it too busy for what I want to do (mostly just specify packages to load and help with configuration in my init.el rather than handling the loading manually for each machine.

      Rather than characterize Wellons' package as less powerful, I'm inclined to think of it as more light-weight. Perfect for the problem I'm trying to solve.